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Don't take our word for it.  Read what our patients have to say about their hearing aids and the service that they receive!

"I have been wearing hearing aids since 1972 but purchased my first Starkey aids in 1998 from A Hearing Service, now O'Brien Hearing Center in 2005. I decided I wanted the newest and best technology I could get in a new hearing instrument and purchased Starkey. I feel that I am getting the best. The professional care I receive is always excellent. I recommend O'Brien Hearing Center & Starkey Hearing Instruments to all who have a hearing loss & need help." -----Ruth B. (Vincennes, IN)

"A world of joy to hear every little sound." -----Gerald H. (Vincennes, IN)

"I have had a good experience with my hearing aid. It works fine. I can hear what is going on & can communicate with most people. This is the best aid I have ever had & have been wearing an aid for over 30 years!" -----Elmer Swartzentruber (Montgomery, IN)

"I am really impressed by how well O'Brien Hearing Center took care of my hearing needs. Not only did I get the hearing aids I needed, but I was really impressed by how well Karin took the time to make sure I understood how my new hearing aids worked. She treated me as a friend listening to what I had to say, and trying different things until I could hear like I should. Her patience was really appreciated. I would recommend O'Brien Hearing Center to anyone." -----Mary M. (Oaktown, IN)

"I am very well pleased the way they have treated my father.  It has improved his hearing a lot, nothing is a 100%, but it is understandable from the way he was.  They are very kind and understanding, and caring - nice people!" -----Jimmie Y. (Freelandville, IN)

"I have enjoyed my hearing aids.  They are easy to care for and put in.  I would recommend them to anyone." -----Mary S. (Monroe City, IN)

"They are just great!" -----RW Miller

"The hearing aids are great for Sandra. Staff is very experienced & helpful. They are also smiling & cheerful." -----Sandra C.

"I have been hard of hearing all through school. I couldn't hear and it was embarrassing to be called upon to read or answer a question. I felt awful to be in a crowd and not be able to hear. I feel I was made fun of & laughed at because I couldn't hear."

"I've been so thankful to be able to come to O'Brien Hearing Center where they have helped me a lot. I hear things I never heard before! The very first time I put hearing aids on, it was amazing to hear things I never actually heard before! I was in a mall and the noise I heard was unbelievable even to be able to hear the birds sing! I was in child care and I definitely had to wear them, but I'm glad to be able to hear and my husband is really thankful that I have them."

"Hearing loss ran in my family so unless you experience a hearing loss, you can't know how it feels not to hear. I'm so thankful for the help I receive from O'Brien Hearing Center. Thank you so much! I've worn hearing aids for 26 years." -----Juanita M.

"Anyone who has been accused of selective deafness (as I was), or who is simply tired of being an aggravation to spouse & family due to hearing loss in certain frequency ranges, should definitely look into the latest products from O'Brien Hearing Center. The completeness of their testing and the range of options they will suggest make improved hearing a pleasant experience. The "service after the sale" will please the most particular person, they convinced me."-----Michael M. (Freelandville, IN)

"My hearing aids are outstanding and the service when I come in is outstanding.  My hearing aids really help me a lot and I would recommend O'Brien Hearing Center & Destiny hearing aids to everybody that needs them." -----Bob Cullison (Odon, IN)

"I am totally pleased with my hearing aids. I would recommend them to anyone. The day I got them, I didn't take them out from the time I got them until I went to bed. I like that you don't have to adjust them to hear. They're already set for you. I didn't realize how much I wasn't hearing. When I go outside the wind doesn't whistle in them." -----Catherine K. (Vincennes, IN)

"I have had good service. Everyone was very helpful." -----Helen D. (Washington, IN)

"My high frequency hearing loss happend in the military (Fort Knox) when I was age 25. For years I have avoided crowded places with lots of background noise because of me not being able to carry on a conversation due to hearing loss. At work, I always had to sit in the front row to have a chance of hearing properly."

"My wife & I finally set out to try to fix that problem. We came to O'Brien's in Jasper, liked what they could offer, went through extensive hearing tests, bought the "aids" and I am very pleased with the results. I can actually hear fine now & it has made me want to be more with people instead of being apart. In the past 2 months since the purchase, we have met 5 or 6 times to evaluate me and to adjust the "aids" to my lifestyle. I am pleased with the equipment, the service, and Terry is great to work with."-----B.Dutchess (Jasper, IN)

"When the realization dawned that I was asking people to repeat themselves, nodding and smiling a lot when I really didn't understand what was being said, sitting closer to the TV, and turning it up and up again, and wandering if my grandsons needed speech therapy (!). It seemed timely when I received the invitation to the Open House at O'Brien Hearing Center in Jasper. Now, a month after having these great Starkey's fitted and fine-tuned, I know that I was missing more than I knew, and that my sense of hearing (though not really very bad) was gradually going."

"Some people think that hearing aids means old age; they're wrong. Lots of people wear glasses and don't think twice about how importantit is to be able to see. We should feel the same about hearing aids. They are so technologically advanced that they are virtually invisible, and I already forget that I have them in my ears. It's a shock when I take them out at night and find myself back in that quiet, non-hearing world.

"Birds sing, crickets "crick", breezes blow, children laugh, footsteps come and go, people chuckle to themselves... All of these sounds I was missing out on. I had nearly forgotten that a breeze through the trees makes a sound. With my hearing aids I feel like I am again truly present in my world. It's a nice place to be."-----Diane B. (Loogootee, IN)

"My hearing aids are doing fine. I am very satisfied with O'Brien Hearing Center." -----Dexter Stuffle, (Washington, IN)

Identification

Every hearing instrument is unique and can be identified by its serial number. The location differs depending on the type of aid you have—Behind-the-Ear (BTE), In-the-Ear (ITE), In-the-Canal (ITC), Completely-in-the-Canal (CIC), or Reciever-in-the-Canal (RIC).

BTE
For BTE models, the serial number is located on the battery door. The manufacturer’s name and the model number can be found on the inner curve of the hearing instrument.

ITE
For ITE models, the serial number is located in the helix area, along with the manufacturer’s name and model number. A red or blue bar next to the number indicates right (red) or left (blue) ear.

ITC
The serial number, manufacturer’s name and model number are all located on the outer shell of In-the-Canal models. A red or blue bar next to the number indicates right (red) or left (blue) ear.

CIC
The serial number, manufacturer’s name and model number are all located on the outer shell of Completely-in-the-Canal models. A red or blue shell color indicates right (red) or left (blue) ear.

RIC
For RIC models, the serial number is located on the battery door. The manufacturer’s name and the model number can be found on the inner curve of the hearing instrument.


Why Board Certification?

Some of the most highly experienced hearing health professionals in the world share a distinguishing symbol-the symbol of certification through NBC-HIS. Certificants are fully committed to providing their patients with quality care.

The achievement of this designation represents their initiative to excel beyond the normal requirements for operating a hearing instrument dispensing practice. The designation, BC-HIS (Board Certified in Hearing Instrument Sciences), distinguishes the persons outstanding skills and professional expertise needed for completion of the National Competency Exam. 


Insertion and removal

Whether you wear Behind-the-Ear (BTE), In-the-Ear (ITE), In-the-Canal (ITC) or Completely-in-the-Canal (CIC) models, your hearing instruments are unique to you, and were made from impressions of your individual ears. They are designed to fit comfortably and to be easy to insert and remove. If for any reason they cause you discomfort, see your hearing professional. In many cases, minor fitting adjustments can be made in their office or clinic.
Insert and remove your hearing aid according to the description for your particular model:

BTE
Before placing the BTE earmold into your ear, first make sure the battery is inserted properly and the battery door is securely closed. Also make sure the M-T-O switch is set to “O” (off).

To insert, hold the earmold on the outer side near the tubing with your thumb and forefinger. Gently insert the canal tip of the earmold into the ear canal. Then softly press the earmold into place with your fingertip.

Carefully place the instrument behind your ear with the earhook and earmold tubing wrapped over the top.

To remove, take the instrument out from behind your ear and gently pull the earmold outward. Pulling down on the ear lobe may help loosen the earmold as it is removed.

ITE
Before placing the ITE in your ear, first make sure the battery is inserted properly and the battery door is securely closed. If the instruments have a volume control, make sure they are in the “off” position.

To insert, hold the instrument between your thumb and forefinger with the volume control toward the top of your ear. The battery compartment should be facing away from your ear canal. Then gently insert the instrument into your ear.

Gently rotate the instrument until its comfortably set inside the bowl of your ear. Pull your ear lobe down slightly and press on the instrument to ensure it is firmly in place.

To remove, grasp the instrument with your thumb and forefinger, and gently rotate it as you pull outward. Never use the battery compartment door to pull the instrument out of your ear—it is not designed to withstand this pressure and may become damaged.

ITC
Before placing the ITC into your ear, first make sure the battery is inserted properly and the battery door is securely closed. If the instruments have a volume control, make sure they are in the “off” position.

To insert, hold the instrument between your thumb and forefinger with the volume control toward the top of your ear. The battery compartment should be facing away from your ear canal. Then gently insert the instrument into your ear canal.

There are two methods of removing the ITC from your ear. One way is by using your finger to gently massage the area behind your ear lobe. The soft pressure should work the instrument out of your ear. The other method is to reach into the ear with thumb and forefinger, and gently pull the instrument out.

Never use the battery compartment door to pull the instrument out of your ear—it is not designed to withstand this pressure and may become damaged.

CIC
Before placing the CIC into your ear, first make sure the battery is inserted properly and the battery door is securely closed.

To insert, hold the instrument with the insertion/removal line between your thumb and forefinger, and the microphone opening at the top of the instrument. Simply guide the instrument down into your ear canal until you feel resistance.

Let go of the insertion line, and push the instrument in until it is resting comfortably inside your canal. To ease insertion, you may wish to pull down on your ear lobe with your other hand as you push.

To remove, slowly and gently pull the insertion/removal line outward.

Never use the battery compartment door to pull the instrument out of your ear—it is not designed to withstand this pressure and may become damaged.


Handling and controls

Always keep your hearing instruments clean and dry. To preserve battery life when you’re not wearing your instruments, open the battery compartment doors so the batteries are not in contact with the internal components.

If your instruments have a volume control, use it to turn them on and off and adjust the level of amplification.

To turn your instruments on, rotate the control forward or clockwise until a comfortable sound level is reached. You may want to adjust the volume as you move between different listening situations. To increase volume, continue rotating the control forward. To make sounds softer, rotate the control backward or counter-clockwise. To turn your instruments off, rotate the control backward as far as it will go.

If your instruments do not have a volume control, they are “on” any time functioning batteries are properly placed in the compartments, and the battery doors are closed. To turn your instruments “off,” simply open the battery compartment doors so the batteries are no longer in contact with the internal components.

When any hearing instrument is “on,” you may occasionally hear a whistling noise known as feedback. It’s more likely to occur while you’re inserting or removing your instrument. Feedback is caused by amplified sounds leaving the ear that are reflected by your hand back into the instrument’s microphone. It should stop when you move your hand away. If you have trouble with persistent feedback, see your hearing professional.


WISE EARS AT WORK!

Here are the facts:

Noise-induced hearing loss is the most common workplace disorder and the second most self-repeated occupational illness or injury.

Thirty million workers are at risk for noise-induced hearing loss and 10 million Americans already have it.

Forty-five percent of carpenters and 48% of plumbers report having a hearing loss.

By age 25, the average carpenter has the same hearing as a 50-year-old person who does not work around hazardous noise.


DON'T LET THIS BE YOU!
Noise-induced hearing loss is 100% preventable, but once you have hearing loss, you'll have it for life. Exposure to harmful sounds causes damage to the sensitive structures of the inner ear. These structures can be injured instantly from an intense brief impulse, such as the explosion of a firecracker, or gradually from continuous exposure to noise, such as in a woodworking shop.


HOW LOUD IS TOO LOUD?
Are you in an area where you have to raise your voice to talk with someone who is an arm's length away? Are your ears ringing or do sounds seem dull or flat after leaving a noisy place? If so, then you are probably exposed to hazardous noise. The degree of a hearing loss is related to both the level of the noise and the duration of the exposure. Sound is measured in decibels (dB). Prolonged (long or repeated) exposure to noise about 85 dB can cause hearing loss. A normal conversation takes places at about 65 dB. A hard drill measures 98 dB, a spray painter 105dB, a hammer drill 114 dB, and a pneumatic percussion drill 119 dB. If the average level of noise in your workplace over 8 hours is 85 dB or higher, you are at risk for noise-induced hearing loss. Start protecting your ears now!



How can you protect your ears?
The safest way to protect your ears is to always wear hearing protection anytime you are around loud noises. You can protect your ears by wearing special earplugs or special earmuffs. There are hundreds of kinds available. There are formable earplugs you can mold to your ears and premolded earplugs that come in several sizes. There are canal caps that are attached to headbands and are very convenient if you work in intermittent noise where you need to take your earplugs on and off throughout the day. Some earplugs have stems so you can insert them without touching the part that goes inside your ear. You can also get earplugs custom molded to fit your ear. Earmuffs come with large and small earcups, and different types of ear cushions. There is something for everyone and for every environment. Which type are you getting?


How can you hear verbal instructions or machine warnings?
Hearing protection will lower the noise level of your equipment, they won't eliminate the sound. There are protectors that lower the sound enough to be safe but allow you to hear speech at a comfortable level. This is especially important for those who work in noise where communication is important. The hearing protectors will bring both noise and warning sounds down equally. So, if the warning sound is audible without the hearing protector, it will usually be audible when wearing the protectors. Some protectors will reduce certain frequencies more than others, so wearing them can make noises sound different. If it is important for you to hear noises just as they are, there are earmuffs and earplugs that reduce all sounds about the same. There are many hearing protectors with built-in communication systems. There are even special high-fidelity earplugs and noise-activated hearing protectors that professional musicians (rock and classical) and mechanics wear. These earplugs and protectors don't change sound quality except for making it softer. They are useful when it's important to hear speech.


Our Favorite Links:

Starkey Laboratories, Inc.

The Starkey Hearing Foundation

International Hearing Society (IHS)

National Board Certification in Hearing Instrument Sciences (NBC-HIS)

Mid America Conference on Hearing

National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)